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TOPIC: experimenting

experimenting 6 years ago #529

  • trickythom
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Today I decided to experiment with diffrent agars on diffrent mushrooms.
I mixed up some malt,dog food and oatmeal agars.
I took tissue samples from shiitke,oyster,crimini and buttons. And spores from portabellas and shiitake. Put them on diffrent agars and now I am waiting for the results.
I will keep you updated.
Anyone have any comments on the agars and strains?
Here is a stupid pictoral of this evenings adventures.
http://trickythom.com/v-web/gallery/Produceislehunting
I bought the mushrooms at my local supermarket.

Peace,
Thom
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Re: experimenting 6 years ago #530

  • cultured1
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I was just discussing agar with a doctor of mycology yesterday, telling him about the agar I use, malt extract agar with a pinch of yeast extract added into the mix. I was told that it is probably the best & simplest ones to use for maintaining mycolocical cultures. I'm not even going to bother with anything else.
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Re: experimenting 6 years ago #536

  • Funguy
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Nice pics thanks, I still can't get past the hepa .thanks for sharing .Cultured1, I use the same formula for most . Changing the diet is a good thing from time to time ,according to stamets .I once knew a guy from Israel that instead of agar he used card board in his petris .I say use what works best for what ever you are growing.Keep Us posted .
I would rather have a bottle in front of me,
Than a frontal lobodomy
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Re: experimenting 6 years ago #538

  • c
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Nice pics, good luck.
I once knew a guy from Israel that instead of agar he used card board in his petris

really? hmm, that makes me think.
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Re: experimenting 6 years ago #539

  • cultured1
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Love the cardboard idea. Sounds like it would work fine for oysters, shitake, & other wood loving species.
I was wondering about Stamets recommending changing agar. Is it really necessary, or just another way Stamets can promote selling more agar on his site.
Let's examine the steps in mushroom cultivation and think about it.
Stock cultures are maintained on agar plates or slants. Most "all purpose" media contain simple sugars as a carbohydrate, & maybe peptone or other nitrogen source. PDA will have some starch from the potato infusion, otherwise there aren't a lot of complex carbohydrates.
Mycellium is transfered to grain which will be used as spawn. Grain has to be malted & mashed for starch to be converted to sugar. Whole rye isn't malted, so you've now gone from a sugar based media to a starch based one. There is a lag phase as the mycellium adjusts to it's new environment, then healthy growth.
The next step is the spawning of a bulk substrate. Depending on the species of mushroom, the substrate may be a dung & straw based compost, maybe a wood based one. Again there is a lag, then growth & hopefully fruit.
The different nutrient sources all require different enzymes for utilization. The ability of an organism to produce various enzymes is genetically predetermined. I'd have to disagree with TMC the ability to digest certain food sources isn't lost just because it wasn't there in previous stages of growth. Going from agar to rye to compost doesn't seem to slow these guys down.
How about formulating you own media for culture maintenance. If you made one that had a similar nutrient makup to your spawn or sub, there would be the least shock to the organism when transfered to a new medium. Try using water from rye cooking, or compost pasteurization for your next batch of agar, pass it through a coffee filter & prepare as usual.

Check out
Fundamental Principles of Bacteriology by A.J. Salle. There is a good chapter on pure culture techniques.
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Re: experimenting 6 years ago #540

  • trickythom
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How about formulating you own media for culture maintenance. If you made one that had a similar nutrient makup to your spawn or sub, there would be the least shock to the organism when transfered to a new medium. Try using water from rye cooking, or compost pasteurization for your next batch of agar, pass it through a coffee filter & prepare as usual.


It seems like this is a common practice. I will give it a go next time.
Thank you for this post.
I never really think about the lag time as being a nutritional transitional stage.
I will have to try to check out that book.
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